[References] “Left-Libertarianism”

TI: Book Reviews SO: Journal of Applied Philosophy VL: 19 NO: 1 PG: 75-90 YR: 2002 ON: 1468-5930 PN: 0264-3758 DOI: 10.1111/1468-5930.00206 US: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1468-5930.00206 AB: Books reviewed: Gordon Graham, Evil and Christian Ethics J. C. Lester, Escape From Leviathan: Liberty, Welfare and Anarchy Reconciled Peter Vallentyne and Hillel Steiner (ed.), The Origins of Left-Libertarianism: An Anthology of Historical Writings; Left-Libertarianism and Its Critics: The Contemporary Debate James P. Sterba, Social and Political Philosophy: Contemporary Perspectives R. S. Downie and Jane MacNaughton, Clinical Judgement: Evidence in Practice John Hardwig, Is There a Duty to Die?: with other essays in Bioethics James M. Humber and Robert F. Almeder (ed.), Is There a Duty to Die?

The Origins of Left-Libertarianism: An Anthology of Historical Writings;

Left-Libertarianism and Its Critics: The Contemporary Debate James P. Sterba,

Review: [untitled] Mark E. Kann The American Political Science Review, Vol. 72, No. 2 (Jun., 1978), pp. 633-634 Berki presents his main thesis: ‘Socialism is not a single thing, but a range, an area, an open texture, a self-contradiction’.” “Berki provides an analytical framework which convincingly differentiates four normative tendencies in socialist thought and their historical representatives. Socialist ‘egalitarianism’ is associated with the underdeveloped world; socialist ‘moralism’ is linked to Western social democracy; socialist ‘rationalism’ is tied to Eastern European/Soviet communism; and socialist ‘libertarianism’ is connected to the New Left. His point is not that one value defines the essence of each variant; rather, Berki demonstrates that the primacy of one value is always in historical tension with (if it does not contradict) the other three.”

New Forms of Political Representation: European Ecological Politics and the Montreal Citizen’s Movement Timothy Thomas Canadian Journal of Political Science / Revue canadienne de science politique, Vol. 28, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 509-531 Published by: Canadian Political Science Association and the Société québécoise de science politique “Kitschelt maintains that the left-libertarian parties can be considered ‘left wing’ in their policy orientations because they affirm the principle of equality, and reject the primacy of markets as the final arbiters of social development and justice. They follow libertarian thinking, however, in rejecting the socialist vision of centralized planning and party organization, and call for greater individual autonomy and for citizen participation in public affairs.”

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